Skip to main content

About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CNBC 4
MSNBCW 4
CSPAN 3
CNNW 2
KQED (PBS) 2
CSPAN2 1
KQEH (PBS) 1
KRCB (PBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 27
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)
of course its friend, china is on the security council and has blocked those kind of actions in the past, jenna. jenna: interesting that you mentioned china. is there any indication that the north koreans had help from the outside? any sort of outside country with this launch? >> reporter: well there is no evidence per se but it is widely known that the north koreans could not get the parts for their ballistic missile program without having those parts flown through china, bypassed through china. there also have been reports on the voice of america that an iranian team of scientists have been seen recently, in recent days in north korea. so there is questions about the relationship between, and any help that may have been provided to the north koreans by the iranians. clearly the north koreans are very proud of this long range ballistic missile launch. the one in april failed miserably. and for the first time then they admitted that it did fail publicly. this time they extended the window and did not invite foreign journalists to watch this and simply announced when it was successful. th
for the group. he was promoted second-in-command earlier this year. >>> back to the economy now, china apparently going on an american spending spree. a chinese company agreed to buy a big chunk of insurance giant aig for more than $4 billion after the company got a huge bailout during the u.s. financial crisis. that is not the only bargain that china is picking up from u.s. taxpayers lately. stuart varney on this morning, head of "varney & company" on fox business network. good morning, stuart. good to see you. >> good morning, martha. martha: they're gobbling up our assets in many ways . what do you make of it. >> they are spending the money they have got buying american assets cheap. you mentioned aig. a chinese company is paying $4 billion for aig's plane leasing business. aig remember got $189 billion as a bailout fund that was back in september of 2008. the taxpayers still are the largest shareholder in aig. we sold the plane leasing business to china cheap. second item, a 123 batteries, americans taxpayers gave that company $249 million in grants and another 250 million in tax s
'm with the world journal. could you address growing chinese assertiveness in south china sea and east china sea? and given china just announced they will intercept the ship's that go into territorial waters. so are you going to participate in upcoming defense talks with chinese? and what message do you want to tell them? thank you. >> well, thank you for that question. of course the issues that are being placed today in a south china sea and other areas in the north and central, east asia, i think are quite complicated because of the nature of the territorial disputes, some of them historic, some of them now driven by the need for access to resources in those areas, and that's i think to some degree has motivated some of the activities that you see, seeing there. the u.s. position as you know is that we don't take sides on territorial disputes. there's many of those around the globe, not just in the south china sea. but we do want them resolve peacefully, without coercion. and that we call on all the parties there, including the chinese, to ensure that as they approach these problems that they
china. >> i think you saw the chinese make clore their opposition to this launch, prior to it and the regret over the fact it took place after it happened. >> we are very much ready to engage with our colleagues on the council. we will be searching for a clear and credible response. >> kim jung un is expected to capitalize on the boost of the internal standing that the launch provided to move to conduct another nuclear test. five years ago, then senator obama vowed for diplomacy with dictators like kim. >> would you be willing to meet with the leaders of iran, syria, venezuela, cuba, north korea? to bring the gap the divides our countries. >> i would. the reason is this. the notion that somehow not talking to countries is punishment to them, which has been the guiding diplomatic principle of this administration is ridiculous. >> yet, it was under the bush administration that the six party talks were launched and achieved the notable success. north korea demolition in 2008 of a water cooling tower used in the nuclear programs. with the obama administration ruling out dire
, calling it a violation of u.n. security council resolutions. and china, north korea's long-time ally, also expressed regret launch calling on the state to abide by u.n. resolutions. now u.n. security council diplomats have also set up an emergency meeting today at the request of the u.s. and japan. back to you. >> all right. thanks for that. >>> the senior fellow at the school of international studies at the technological university. thanks for joining us. what does this test do today? what's the impact on regional securit security? >> short term, i don't think the impact is going to be particularly severe. in some ways it's been priced in. and for once, north korea's rocket actually did what it was supposed to do which is fly south and not pass over any territory. so in that sense, the reaction can be contained. on the other hand, it caught people by surprise. and i think there will be questions ask the about how could the intelligence -- how good the intelligence was in the u.s. and south korea in failing to pick this up. >> how significant is it that this launch appears to be successful
. >> reporter: the problem is there are very few options in terms of appropriate action. as you know china sits on the u.n. security council and has blocked efforts in the past to sanction the north korean regime. they are its only ally but a very powerful ally. it is not clear at this time whether china is willing to go along with any u.n. security council recommendations for further punishment of north korea. they are in violation of two significant resolutions but it is unclear what real authority the international community has in terms of punishing north korea further. jenna: interesting tie some of our top stories together. china continues to be a problem in syria. that is our top story of the day. jennifer, we'll continue to watch developments there. jon: watching the crisis in syria, a nation that continues to unravel. there are reports that more than a dozen died in a car bombing, many of them women and children. the state news agency say a car packed with explosives blew up near a school in a neighborhood outside the capital of damascus. we're learning forces loyal to president bashar
in congering this new horizon under his leadership. you have these leadership changes in china and japan next week, and it gives them a leg up in coming back to the negotiating table as a stronger country because they've demonstrated this long-range technolo technology. >> so you look back at april and the embarrassing failed launch. it has a lot of people wondering how this successful launch could come so quickly on the heels of the other, and it also has people asking who may be helping north korea at this time. obviously, iran enters into the picture when people do discuss this. is this something that is a game change for us in terms of how to deal with north korea and iran at the same time? >> i think it's a pretty big deal. the april launch was not successful, but if you track their launches going back to 2006, the 2006 and particularly the 2009 tests were fairly successful. so the fact that this one came about, whatever happened in april was something, some mechanical problem was catastrophic, but this test was clearly a success. yes, there is cooperation between iran and north korea. e
.n. security council. it's likely china will try to water down those provisions but it's also certain that the provisions will pass. >> you don't think china will try to veto it? >> i don't think they will veto it. they don't want north korea doing this. >> china is the only ally that they really have. i wonder, do you think it's possible they didn't inform china in advance of the timing of this launch? >> it's possible they did not. people now suspect that the information that we had that north korea was moving its rocket, something was wrong with it, was it an intentional deceptive move? they thought there would be attempts to shoot it down. they wanted to fool japan. they succeeded. >> and it certainly does strengthen the new young leader kim jong-un domestically. >> absolutely. they have been trying since 1998 to launch a long-range missile and they failed in the previous four attempts. they succeeded in this. it's not a rocket that can deliver a major warhead. there are marriajor hurdles to >> they have done in north korea where a lot of people are starving what south korea has b
. and so what i'm hoping is that in 2013, the central banks of the united states, europe, and china will find a solution to at stop the growth of that disparity. because i believe it's not right there is such a big gap between these derivatives and the actual products. >> so would a resolution of the fiscal cliff in the united states mean that america stops running up debt, would that be a positive step towards resolving that problem, even though it could be a drag on growth in the u.s. economy? >> translator: do not regard myself as a highly educated economist. from where i am, i watch the debate and i see, for example, some economists such as the nobel laureate paul goodman believe this could be counterproductive because too many action of this type could damage one of the important factors of the u.s. economy. on the other hand, unless there is some limit to the growth of u.s. debt, particularly with respect to debt as related to gdp, this could serve in the end badly if there was no limit to it. after all, the u.s. economy still accounts for about one-third of the global economy
guidance was below expectations due to soft sales in china. >>> speaking of china, apple will soon be able to sell his newest version of the iphone there. >>> as for the economy, consumer spending fell slightly last month due to disruptions from >>> welcome back to "hardball." republicans have spent the past three weeks at least doing an elaborate and very public autopsy on the 2012 election. asking what went wrong. good question. like democrats before them after losing an election, they're focusing on the usual suspects, we didn't have the right candidate, didn't get our message out, didn't get our voters out. when you lose the popular vote of five or six elections, you have to consider the voters just didn't reject your messenger, they rejected perhaps your message. we have two strategists back with us. one democrat steve mcmahon and republican rick tyler. rick, you first because you guys lost, and i don't mind saying this because i'm heartened by this. i didn't know it was going to happen. i thought the first debate, as i said clearly on the air -- the president said i was having a stro
. that is something surprising at this point. >> in china they have no ideology. 75 members of the communist national people's congress are billionaires now. >> i also learned that you like me do nothing on new year's eve. >> not nothing, you just don't do it with strangers. >> i'm happy to make it. absolutely. but here's something for you. you are watching "morning joe." here's what happens. right now it's time for that. take it away. >> aloha, hawaii. the president is on his way back to d.c. where for him it's about playing small ball with most members of congress still in their home district, speaker boehner put that ball in the senate's court. harry reid tossed it right back. are we looking at another lost day in the negotiations? hitching a right on air force one, the new senator from hawaii and it's not what we expected it to be. here we go again. the president in washington and another deadline. secretary geithner warns we will hit the debt ceiling even before we tumble over the fiscal cliff. good morning from washington. it is thursday, december 27th. this is "the daily rundown." i'm luke rus
it over the last 8 years is to take out a credit card from the bank of china in the name of our children, driving up our national debt from $5 trillion from the first 42 presidents, number 43 ed a $4 trillion by his lonesome so we now have over $9 trillion of debt that we're going to have to pay back. $30,000 for every man, woman and child. that's irresponsible. it's unpatriotic. >> so, unpatriotic. >> the hypocrite in chief says in 2008 that 5 from is unpatriotic but now we're up to $16.4 trillion. that's okay. by the way we move my credit card limits. he doesn't want a debt ceiling going forward. >> debt ceiling no more can congress deal when the president says we're going to raise the debt ceiling. no squabbles back and forth. >> let me get this straight. borrow $4.8 billion a day and now we're coming to the edge ever the fiscal cliff. republicans are saying hey, let's continue the bush tax cuts, let's make this fair for everyone but let's stop spending. we are spending more than we have. democrats are saying now they are saying it doesn't matter, we are not focused on the deficit any
transportation. i'm concerned about education. i'm concerned about cutting in all of these areas that make china -- give china a bigger advantage as we move forward that give our global competitors a bigger advantage. that's what really concerns me. >> two quick observations. if you're in business and you're told we've got to make changes at our budget and you look at 6%, 15% of your budget, 9% of your budget, you've got to make cuts, you look at the 60% first and say where can we make manufacture she's cuts. talk about not endangering our ability to compete and win going forward, you don't want to cut those areas as steve has talked about eloquently many times, there are advantages which means you have to look at entitlements. and i think to michael's point, i think there's credit to that. two, i like the fact that boehner now is in a stronger position with his caucus because if indeed they find a deal, that means he can win a majority of his people over. i like the fact that nancy pelosi's in a strong position with her caucus. so the pieces are not only coming together substantively, they're c
] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> welcome back to squawk. happy monday. today in the "wall street journal" suggesting netflix could end up doomed with its success with children. netflix just for kids get more popular. companies like viacom get accurate. companies provide netflix with most of its content in a kids' focused section. the journal says at some point the suppliers will probably want to charge netflix more or they might even stop selling to netflix. that's been a huge problem for them when it comes to contend more broadly. >> time for the global markets report. kelly evans standing by in london. you rise above over
china will go grow as fast. then you have the united states uncertainty. suddenly they pull back. and then they don't know the personal tax grow, and they pull back. so what i try to talk more about is what our clients see than what we see. because what i think we add value, we see 30,000 market companies in the country and by hearing from them, we can help arctic could you what the what they're seeing and how they're behaving. >> that is one of his huge concerns that at this point, it's too late to save anything with 2013 blaurly for small businesses and their plans in terms of hiring. for 2014, you could be tinkering with that at that point if this pushes in to 2013. and take's that's the biggest t took away. we're really threatening 2014, too. >> i haven't heard so much that about the fiscal cliff. >> it was not just the fiscal cliff, it was time after time, the start of the debt ceiling talks and then they get pushed off, these are temporary fixes and it keeps coming. >> i guess one of the things that we kind of focus on is what happens after the fiscal cliff. because that ju
. let's look at the rankings to see where the u.s. falls and south korea falls. coming in first in china, south korea, then finland and an u.s.a. number 24. math is similar: >> cenk: we're number one. >> now similar story again when it comes to science: >> that in in a's really kicking our ass. >> cenk: that would be another segment. >> cenk: number one. >> now barack obama has been on the record saying really great things about the educational system in south korea. let's take a look. >> our children, listen to this, our children spend over a month less in school than children in south korea every year. that's no way to prepare them for a 21st century economy. >> well, he's right. if you look at the number, south korea spends 220 days a year in class, in the u.s., 180 days per year. in finland it's 190. with south korea and finland you have two opposite ends of the spectrum. turns out both work. we can have a discussion as to what's better, but whatever the u.s. is doing that's not working. when it comes to education funding in korea basically it's the number one in family spending on p
so? >> people on his team wanted him to use nuclear weapons against china and -- vietnam. admiral ratford wanted to nuke -- >> how would you nuke in a jungle? >> it's called tactical nuclear weapons. eisenhower threatened to use them. he was good at bluffing. >> is that how he ended korea? >> historians tackled this and -- >> by the way -- >> threatening something worse? >> well, that's what they say. i want to congratulate him, by the way, on this book. i've really enjoyed it, evan. we had talked about it earlier. this is a -- this bluff that you cover in the eisenhower years is a really critical part of the story of that era. it's also a bluff that, in all fairness, condition continues into the kennedy years. the cuban missile years involved the same kind of stakes that happened in berlin and in korea, indochina. eisenhower was a wartime commander and he understood the difficulties in dealing with the soviets but because he commanded the western front in world war ii, he also understood the possibilities for rough or fundamental, i would say, co-existence or cooperation with the
, engineering, and math. if you dig in, the numbers are stunning. you look at the fact that i think china is now roughly 44% of their graduates are in those fields. europe is at 24%. america is at 16% of our graduates. i say this respectfully, knowing we are on c-span, but when the europeans are outdistancing us by 50% in an area as important talent inng human challeng these key fields that will drive innovation, you know we are in trouble. i will correct one comment, the democratic side and marco rubio and jerry moran, we have put forward legislation long before the election that says let's look at this, the competition issue and put forward an approach that many of us, including those of us in the business world, have been talking about for decades. let's recognize that while we know that we do need to prime the pump with science, engineering, math graduates, native-born americans, partly in the numbers with middle school with girls and children of color and the enormous challenges short and long term, we also have to still continue to attract talent from the world. one of the ways that we can
at that route, you're leaving africa, going through central area, up around china, across the bering strait, i'm assuming you're taking a boat and through the americas. one of those, as i'm noticing, the strait line goes right through iran. how do you get through that? >> i think that -- iran straddles an ancient migration path into central asia and ideally it would be wonderful to set off on foot across iran. i'm going to see what relations are like in the late 2015, hopefully they're well enough, good enough, to allow me to go through iran. >> sreenivasan: if there's a necessary detour, how long does that take to get around? >> it's a big place to walk around. part of the beauty, i think, of this long project is that there are going to be obstacles that i don't know answers to about how to get around them until i get there. and we'll see. sarin dip city a big part of this project. >> sreenivasan: what are the types of steps you've been taking? you've been planning this for a last couple years. visas? immunizations. what else? >> there's a lot of logistical planning that's gone into getting m
to pay toward china and the middle east will not let him. there was a successful sabotaging program against iran's nuclear program and a ery new approach of iran's central bank and other institutions that continues to enrich uranium. is kind of're seeing the twilight of america's cold war imperium in the middle east. the u.s. will have a relationship with the new egypt but it will not be the relationship of a client state that we saw with's the minority -- hosni mubarak or on war said sadat. is the changing relationship in the country like pakistan after the osama bin laden raid and in states like yemen. they look over the horizon that bahrain and say, we do not want that. host: one of the papers this morning has a story taking a look at the change in leadership in specific countries in asia and highlighting what is going on in north korea, south korea, and japan. what does that prove for the administration? guest: you can put north korea in the same category as japan and south korea. they have taken power and have produced leaders but are still checked by the open society and by th
kim three seems to can consolidate his power. we are waiting to see if this affects china and their soup harris: you mentioned the evidence that south korea has found that the north will be able to fire at us, at our mainland, possibly come in the next two years. is there anything the south is doing at this point? people are feeling imminent danger. >> the south issued that warning about the capability about the missile tests. there is concern about the region, but it is very difficult to stop anything like that. we have some kind of missile patriots in different types of missiles to try to stop that. but it is very difficult if you have a three stage rocket to be able to bring that down very easily. but we did see before that last test that south korea and japanese and american forces were put on alert. perhaps bring you down and casey came came into their territory. back to you. harris: david pifer reporting live today from bangkok. jon: the fiscal cliff is a sport is a way. looking beyond the deadline, short-term battle will have a long-term political impact. let's talk
it -- and partners such as singapore and the philippines and expanding our dialogue and -- in exchanges with china. we are also an handed our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes -- expanding our presence and capabilities in the region. that includes allocating our naval fleet to have a 60/40 s plit between the pacific and atlantic oceans, increasing army and marine presence in the region. locating our most advanced aircraft in the pacific, including new deployments of f- 22's and the mv22's to japan. and lay the groundwork for the first overseas deployment of the f-35 joint strike fighter. the third element of our strategy is that as we do force projection in the asia-pacific and middle east, we still have to maintain our global leadership and presence by building innovative partnerships and partner capacity across the globe and using these innovative rotational deployment as a way to do exercises and training with other countries, developing their capabilities so they can provide for their own security. in latin america, africa, europe, and elsewhere. the past decade of war has
Search Results 0 to 26 of about 27 (some duplicates have been removed)